NYSC:Position of The Law On Some Sundry Issues

The brouhaha being caused by the alleged certificate forgery by Nigeria’s Minister of Finance,Mrs.Kemi Adeosun, is still the topic of the moment. It is therefore pertinent to take a cursory look at the position of the law in respect of the foregoing issue. 

Formation of the NYSC

The National Youth Service Corps (NYSC) was set up by the Yakubu Gowonadministration on May 22, 1973 as a tool for re-building the nation and reconciliation after the civil war by decree No. 24.

The aim of Gowon’s government was to promote promotion of national unity and build strong bonds among youths of Nigeria.

There have also been calls recently, for the scrapping of the scheme based on issues of security in some parts of the country, but proponents of the scheme have argued that it has helped graduates from universities and polytechnics appreciate the values and culture of other ethnic groups, and  that it has achieved some of the objectives set by its founding fathers.

A quick look at the NYSC Act that deals with the issue of forgery and refusal to participate in the scheme, reveals several jail terms and fines for offenders.

According to Law Nigeria, section 13 of the NYSC Act states as follows:

 (1)    Any person—

(a)    who fails to report for service in the service corps in the manner directed by the Directorate or as the case may be, prescribed pursuant to the provisions of this Act; or

(b)    who refuses to make himself available for service in the service corps continuously for the period specified in subsection (2) of this section, is guilty of an offence and liable on conviction to a fine of N2,000 or to imprisonment for a term of twelve months or to both such fine and imprisonment.

(2)    Any person who—

(a)    under the provisions of this Act is not eligible to participate in the service corps so participates or attempts to so participate is guilty of an offence; or

(b)    having served in the service corps and has been duly issued with a Certificate of National Service or certificate of exemption, as the case may be, and is not eligible to serve under the same service corps so participates or attempts to so participate is guilty of an offence, and liable on conviction to a fine of N4,000 or to imprisonment for a term of two years or to both such fine and imprisonment.

(3)    Any person who fails to comply with or who contravenes or causes or aids or abets another to contravene any provision of this Act (not being a provision relating to the calling up of members of the service corps) is guilty of an offence and liable on conviction to a fine of N5,000 or to imprisonment for a term of three years or to both such fine and imprisonment.

(4)    Any person who—

(a)    in giving any information for the purposes of this Act knowingly or recklessly makes a statement which is false; or

(b)    forges or uses or lends to or allows to be used other than in the manner provided by this Act by any other person any certificate issued pursuant to the provisions of this Act; or

(c)    makes, or has in his possession any document so closely resembling any certificate so issued as to be calculated to deceive, is guilty of an offence and liable on conviction to a fine of N5,000 or to imprisonment for a term of three years or to both such fine and imprisonment.

(5)    Where an offence under subsection (3) of this section which has been committed by a body corporate is proved to have been committed with the consent or connivance of, or to be attributable to any neglect on the part of any director, manager, secretary or other official of the body corporate, or any person purporting to act in such capacity, he as well as the body corporate shall be deemed to be guilty of that offence and shall be liable to be proceeded against and punished accordingl.

Formation of the NYSC

The National Youth Service Corps (NYSC) was set up by the (Gen.Retd) Yakubu Gowon administration on May 22, 1973 as a tool for re-building the nation and reconciliation after the civil war by decree No. 24.

The aim of Gowon’s government was to promote promotion of national unity and build strong bonds among youths of Nigeria.

There have also been calls recently, for the scrapping of the scheme based on issues of security in some parts of the country, but proponents of the scheme have argued that it has helped graduates from universities and polytechnics to appreciate the values and culture of other ethnic groups, and  that it has achieved some of the objectives set by its founding fathers.

A quick look at the NYSC Act that deals with the issue of forgery and refusal to participate in the scheme, reveals several jail terms and fines for offenders.

According to Law Nigeria, section 13 of the NYSC Act states as follows:

 (1)    Any person—

(a)    who fails to report for service in the service corps in the manner directed by the Directorate or as the case may be, prescribed pursuant to the provisions of this Act; or

(b)    who refuses to make himself available for service in the service corps continuously for the period specified in subsection (2) of this section, is guilty of an offence and liable on conviction to a fine of N2,000 or to imprisonment for a term of twelve months or to both such fine and imprisonment.

(2)    Any person who—

(a)    under the provisions of this Act is not eligible to participate in the service corps so participates or attempts to so participate is guilty of an offence; or

(b)    having served in the service corps and has been duly issued with a Certificate of National Service or certificate of exemption, as the case may be, and is not eligible to serve under the same service corps so participates or attempts to so participate is guilty of an offence, and liable on conviction to a fine of N4,000 or to imprisonment for a term of two years or to both such fine and imprisonment.

(3)    Any person who fails to comply with or who contravenes or causes or aids or abets another to contravene any provision of this Act (not being a provision relating to the calling up of members of the service corps) is guilty of an offence and liable on conviction to a fine of N5,000 or to imprisonment for a term of three years or to both such fine and imprisonment.

(4)    Any person who—

(a)    in giving any information for the purposes of this Act knowingly or recklessly makes a statement which is false; or

(b)    forges or uses or lends to or allows to be used other than in the manner provided by this Act by any other person any certificate issued pursuant to the provisions of this Act; or

(c)    makes, or has in his possession any document so closely resembling any certificate so issued as to be calculated to deceive, is guilty of an offence and liable on conviction to a fine of N5,000 or to imprisonment for a term of three years or to both such fine and imprisonment.

(5)    Where an offence under subsection (3) of this section which has been committed by a body corporate is proved to have been committed with the consent or connivance of, or to be attributable to any neglect on the part of any director, manager, secretary or other official of the body corporate, or any person purporting to act in such capacity, he as well as the body corporate shall be deemed to be guilty of that offence and shall be liable to be proceeded against and punished accordingly.

(Originally posted by Pulse.ng and edited by W. Warigon)

Black Twitter gives Kim Kardashian a lesson on cultural appropriation for the millionth time

No matter how many times she gets called out, Kim Kardashian just can’t stop appropriating Black c

Kim Kardashian theGrio.com
(Photo by Kevin Mazur/One Voice: Somos Live!/Getty Images and Snapchat)
    

No matter how many times she gets called out, Kim Kardashian just can’t stop appropriating Black culture.

The reality star is back in the hot seat after taking to Snapchat to show off what she called her “Bo Derek Braids.” Kardashian appeared to be giving a nod to the braiding style worn by actress Bo Derek in the 1979 film, 10.

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Black Twitter, ever keen to call out cultural appropriators, was quick to chime in and inform Kardashian that Derek, who is white, was not the originator of the braids.

The proper term for the hairstyle is actually called Fulani braids, which comes from the people of Fula in West Africa.

Schooled on social media

Though it appears Kardashian is clueless about the origins of cornrow braids, outraged Twitter users had no problem giving her a crash course.

“Kim Kardashian got on Fulani braids and called them ‘Bo Derek’ braids. These why culture appropriation trash. Also, how many times is that family gonna get dragged for them to stop appropriating other people’s culture. This why Beyonce don’t like her stiff lips ass,” wrote one user.

K. Michelle says ‘Kim K’ song is about a culture that neglects Black women

Another Twitter user wrote, “They are called Fulani braids or some may even say corn rows. You could of called them either one but you called them “Bo derek” giving credit to a white woman for a black style knowing you already catch heat for culture vulturing.”

A history of appropriating Black women

Kim Kardashian is no stranger to accusations of cultural appropriation. Her very ascent in Hollywood, many argue, is centered around her physical attributes, which are derived from Black women.

Criticisms of appropriation only intensified as she and her sisters’ fame grew. The appropriation of Black culture continued on as the Kardashian clan began rocking braids and other fashion styles popularized and originated by women of color.

Singer K. Michelle even made a song about it. The R&B star’s song “Kim K” serves as a criticism on the culture that values the Kardashians but won’t value the Black culture that’s inspired their looks.

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“The statement behind the song is black women are rarely given credit for our cultural trends and flyness,” the singer said.

“For ages Black women have been taught by society that our image isn’t good enough for mainstream or that we need to make changes. I believed them and made those SOME of those changes, only 2 regret it,” she added.

“The older I got I started to see that women of other ethnicities were being accepted for and African American women were told no 2 big asses, cornrolls, long pointy finger nails(which was taking place before we were born-its tribal) and other cultural aesthetics.”

Posted by Getting Keith Gaynor